Tag: el che

Downsizing

Narrowing down the list of prospective concepts down to a more approachable number than 11, we are down to 4 (not counting the cookie), thanks.

Fire Cake: dulce de leche cake, caramel, fire ancho marshmallow, magic

Smoking Pionono: Tamarind Cake Roll, Crunchy Fluff, Smoking Cashews, Hot Cajeta Drizzle, Roasted Banana Ice Cream

Carbonated Chocotorta: Chocolate Maciena Cookie Stack, Cannoli Crema, Fizzing Strawberry Meringue, Chocolate sorbet, Carbonated Strawberries, Pistachio

Argentinean Float: Fernet Ice Cream, Mexican Cocoa Cola, Rum Cherries, Candied Almonds, Milk Foam

Alfajore de Macienca: shortbread sandwich cookie filled with dulce de leche

Additional Items, not listed on the dessert menu:

Potato Focaccia with Malden Salt and Olive Oil

Dulce de batata: a sweet potato candy offered with the dessert menu

Ok, that is all for now…

 

Wait For It…

I have perhaps the best idea ever for a dessert.  I am going to say a word that I never thought I would ever say pertaining to a dessert, especially when the word “great” or “best” or “anticipation-worthy” is involved.

So here it is: s’more.

There, I said it.  If you immediately lose interest, I understand.  I certainly would not listen past this word when someone is trying to describe an innovative product, a salivary-induced dessert, and new idea that will spark imagination and delight.

Also, I will not say “deconstructed” because the dish is not deconstructed, it is reconstructed.  But that word will not appear in the name or even in the description based on principal- the principal that deconstructed is an overdone and a cliché concept.  Anything resembling that terribly passé word will be lumped into that same, shameful category.

I am thinking about calling it “Fireside” or perhaps “The Rebirth of S’more.”

I don’t want dull childhood memories of this store-bought mélange of ingredients to come across as misleadingly simple or contrived.  This ‘new best idea ever dish’ amplifies the best part of the s’more while also improving upon the aspects that are underwhelming.

I can’t say too many details about this idea without giving away too much.  You have to wait for it.  The intended restaurant where this is to début is not open for business yet.  The doors are not open, the fires are not lit, the tables are not yet set.  Until then menus are printed, until the water glasses filled, until your cocktail shaken, until the music spinning, full disclosure on “Fireside” is clandestine.

The best part of this over used childhood treat is in the applying of heart to transform the ordinary into the somewhat extravagant.  The parts themselves are simple, but together they transform into a classic.  Since the best part about the s’more concept is the interactive involvement of everyone, a active role will play a part in the enjoyment of this dessert.

The underwhelming part of the this treat is the reason why I don’t even think that the s’more is good.  It is this gooey glob with a single note sweetness.  Let’s be honest, it’s boring.  Outside of the bonfire, it’s bland.  The novelty trumps taste, the overall impression being lack luster.  There are only two flavor profiles, being chocolate and graham.  I think I can do better.

Unfortunately this is call I can tell you until El Che opens its doors, until there is wood for the hearth, until someone can slide your credit card.  Until then, keep your tongues anxious and your minds curious.